Mora Hardwood Lumber

Being hard, tough, heavy, and strong Mora timber has many uses. Best suited for heavy construction work, jetties, bridge timber, house framing, bridge decking, heavy-duty industrial flooring, and planking. It is also particularly suitable for railroad cross-ties.

Mora Hardwood Lumber

mora

Mora

Scientific Name: Mora Excelsa – (Family: Caesalpiniaceae)
A.T.I.B.T. Standard Name: Mora
Other Names: - Nora, Dakama, Pracuuba

Mora is a very strong, stiff, hard, and tough timber. It is one of the most plentiful high-quality heavy timbers in the Caribbean.

THE TREE

The tree grows 2-3 feet in diameter and 100-120 feet in height. Boles measure 70-80 feet, rounded or flattened.

WOOD APPEARANCE

Mora heartwood varies from chocolate-brown to reddish brown. Sapwood has yellowish to pale brown color. The grain is straight to commonly interlocked, very variable and often has attractive bird’s-eye, wavy, or sometimes ribbon-grain figures. The luster is high and the texture varies from medium to coarse.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Mora is a very heavy and very hard wood. It has outstanding strength properties, and is particularly resistant to wear.

Weight: In the green condition the timber weighs 77 pounds per cubic foot, and 55-68 pounds per cubic foot (900-1100 kg/m3) when air-dry.

Specific Gravity: Air-dry wood averages about 1.00 based on air-dry volume and weight, and averages .78 based on green volume and oven-dry weight.

NATURAL DURABILITY

Mora heartwood is a durable timber. Mora is susceptible to damage by marine borers, but very resistant to dry-wood termites and other insects. Mora is also remarkably fire resistant.

TIMBER PROCESSING

Seasoning: Mora is difficult to season. Drying must be slow and carried out in a careful manner because of risk of distortion and checking.

Working/Machining: Difficult to saw, because of its density and interlocked grain. With the same qualification it can be planed, easily turned, and splits with great difficulty.

Assembly: Difficult to nail, but holds nails and rail spikes well. Preboring is necessary.

Finishing: Mora will finish smoothly. It will also stain and polish satisfactorily.

PRESERVATION

Extremely resistant to preservative treatments.

USES

Being hard, tough, heavy, and strong Mora timber has many uses. Best suited for heavy construction work, jetties, bridge timber, house framing, bridge decking, heavy-duty industrial flooring, and planking. It is also particularly suitable for railroad cross-ties.

SUPPLIES

Very common in Guyana. Abundant and regular supplies assured.